Drainage Project: #1 Green BVCC

Click here to see the Drainage Project.

Update: 13 Green Kingswood

We have targeted week of November 26th to begin the next phase of this project as described in the information below. Over the past seven weeks the encroaching Bermuda grass has been sprayed 3 times. The last spray was on October 26.

At that time, there was very little live bermuda observed.  With the kill we’ve achieved and the bermuda going into winter dormancy there is no reason to wait any longer to sod the encroached area.

On Monday November 26th we will close the green and start renovating the surround.

The process is as follows

  • The dead Bermuda will be stripped, the ground will be lightly graded to match the green surface and bent grass will be taken from the nursery and laid around the green.
  • The green will be reopened once the new sod has been laid.
  • During the fall the new sod will be rolled and topdressed and grown slightly taller than the green to encourage rooting.
  • In the early spring of 2019 the height will gradually be taken down to greens height at which time the new sod will be playable as a greens surface.
  • We fully expect the new area to need additional maintenance during the 2019 season until it is fully established. This will include additional hand watering, topdressing, and small tine aerification.
  • The large oscillating fan from #6 Berksdale will be moved to the left side of #13 green Kingswood and the small square fans in the back of the green will be removed.

During the re-sodding a temporary green in the approach will be used.

We appreciate your patience during this time and apologize for any inconvenience.  We are confident that this project will improve your golfing experience.

Thank you.

#1 Green – Bella Vista Country Club

At the end of September, the sprayer malfunctioned while putting an application on the greens at BVCC. It was discovered that the sprayer was putting out a much higher rate than intended. Due to this malfunction, some of the greens were injured. The most notable of the greens injured was #1. While most of the green will recover on its own with time, an underlying issue was exposed which will require some additional work to be done.

The front (bottom) of #1 green was significantly damaged from the malfunctioning sprayer. The reason for this is that the drainage in the green is not functioning properly. Where most of the green was able to drain the excess chemicals through, the front of the green held onto the chemicals and the grass soaked them all up, due to the drainage not working properly. This highly concentrated area of the green was not able to withstand the injury.

Moving forward, it is in the best interest of BVCC to fix the drainage issue, to prevent potential future problems. While this drainage replacement would be a significant improvement, it should be noted that this will be a temporary fix until we completely renovate the entire greens drainage.

Starting Monday November 26, the new drainage pipe will be installed in the front portion of the green. We will re-sod this area using grass from our nursery green. While we do not anticipate the green being closed for a long period of time, we will need to use a temporary green on #1 while the sod grows in and becomes an acceptable playing surface. Thank you for your patience as we perform this necessary work.

Rob Dreesen, Superintendent, BVCC

Drainage Pipe on Front of #1 Green. The USGA recommends drainage pipe be at least 16 inches deep. The current depth is only 6 inches deep.

Black layer caused by broken drainage pipe and pipe being installed at an inadequate depth.

Winter Covering of Ultradwarf Bermudagrass Greens Freeze Protection

There are no ifs, ands or buts about it. Cold temperatures can damage Bermudagrass. History has shown that unprotected Bermudagrass putting greens are often the first victim of an all-Bermudagrass golf course to succumb to colder temperatures. Fortunately, turf covers can dramatically decrease the chance of winter injury. Golf courses with Ultradwarf putting greens in the transition zone (like NW Arkansas) need covers and must deploy them when conditions warrant.

We purchased green covers as part of the overall greens conversion project at Scotsdale in 2016. After the unusually cold winter of 2017-2018 we have purchased an additional set of tarps which will allow us to double cover under similar severe weather in the future (temperatures approaching zero or below or extended periods when temperatures remain below freezing). We also have covers that we have been using since the installation of the ultradwarf bermudagrass greens at Brittany. The following guidelines will be utilized this winter at Scotsdale. These guidelines are based on our experience with the greens at Brittany, guidelines provided to us by our Ultradwarf Bermudagrass supplier, winter of 2017-18, Champion Turf Farm, and recommendations from the USGA Agronomist.

Since our Scotsdale greens were replanted in June of this year, we will be utilizing a more conservative approach again this winter, deploying the new, thicker and darker covers when the temperatures are forecast to be below 27 degrees and trending down. When the forecast is for temperatures in mid-teens or expected to remain below freezing for an extended period we will install the second set of tarps. Under these conditions our original tarps will go down first, and the new tarps will then be placed on top and secured. It will be necessary to close the course the day before since it requires a minimum of 6 hours to complete deployment on all 18 holes plus putting and nursery greens. If we double tarp it may require additional time to complete deployment. Once temperatures allow for the removal of tarps an additional day, maybe longer if double tarped, will be required to remove the tarps as well. We will give as much advanced notice as possible to the Pro Shop personnel, Golf Operations Office and on Today’s Play on the web.

We appreciate everyone’s understanding and cooperation.

Kyle Soller, Superintendent, Scotsdale

 

Frost Delays

“While much of the U.S. deals with winter’s brunt, golfers in the Sun Belt and other mild parts of the country are still playing away. However, cool, crisp mornings bring the risk of frost delays. At some golf courses frost delays are rare, while at others they may be a regular occurrence. How often your morning round is affected by frost depends on the weather and a variety of other factors. Here are five things every golfer should know about frost delays.” Read more.

Scotsdale Update

Fall is here, and winter temperatures are coming.  Soon we will be having frost which will cause the Bermuda grass to start going dormant. Since Scotsdale has Bermuda greens that do go dormant, we do have to do some things differently.

Due to the turf going dormant, old cup plugs do not heal in on the greens. For this reason, we will be cutting 3 pins in each green for blue, red, and white flags. The ones we use for setup that day will have the flags in and we will have a special insert for the other two. This will help keep a better appearance for the greens and not have a bunch of old plugs on each of them, since over time that could be numerous. We will watch the wear around these and switch as needed to keep from thinning turf around these set positions. This will go into effect starting this weekend (October 20).

We will also be painting the greens. This is a process that we have started already by incorporating a pigment into the turf while it is still green. This is part of a process as the pigment helps hold onto the turfs natural color just a little longer. Later we will come back and spray a special turf paint to give the dormant turf a green appearance for play. As we go thru winter and see that starting to fade we will re-apply as needed.

I hope this helps everyone understand a little more about what we do and that everyone has been enjoying the course.

Kyle Soller, Superintendent, Scotsdale

Berksdale Update

It’s been a long hot summer for golf, but fall is bringing more families out to play and the after work crowd is enjoying a quick afternoon round. Fall is also highlighting some of our ongoing wildlife habitat improvements.

Monarch butterfly sightings continue to increase as we expand our milkweed plantings. Three different species of milkweed seedlings were distributed to various niches in the spring, and self-seeding is anticipated over time. Northwest Arkansas is in the re-generation layover as monarchs migrate through the year. Caterpillars were noted in late August, and fresh adults are being spotted throughout the course now.

Our experiments with planting for flood mitigation/riparian restoration are less majestic but have been equally successful. The red twig dogwood plantings along the creek at 2 Fairway took a beating. Minor flooding in February, April and May did little damage;  prolonged heat and drought through September did take a toll. As predicted, we had a 10% survival rate… twenty plus shrubs along a 200 yard stretch remain vigorous.

Berksdale is well on it’s way to achieving full status as an Audubon International Cooperative Sanctuary. Various alterations around the course, from increasing the buffer zone along Little Sugar Creek to establishing native plants at the half way house to expanding prairie grass acreage, are all in line with encouraging a strong stewardship legacy. For more information on how you may get involved, please see auduboninternational.org, or contact wendyb@bvvpoa.com.

Greens Research

The turfgrass science team from the University of Arkansas will be conducting research on two of the putting greens at Brittany over the next 6-7 months. The first objective of the research is to better understand the proper chemicals to use to control spring dead spot, which is the most significant disease on Bermudagrass putting greens. This disease is active during the winter when the grass is dormant, but the symptoms will show up in the spring as dead patches when the grass greens up. To control this, disease control products have to be applied in the fall before the disease becomes active in the winter. We will be testing several new products on the back side of the second green to help identify the best control methods on the Bella Vista property.

The second trial we will be conducting will be on the 7th green and the study objective is to look at several chemical treatments that will not only control spring dead spot but can also enhance the overall health of the turf in the winter. These products will hopefully help protect the grass from winter injury and promote earlier spring green-up (= earlier golf!!).

Golf Course Aeration to Occur

The POA Golf Maintenance Department will aerate golf courses in October.

By core aerating greens, water and air movement are allowed throughout the greens profile. “Aerating the greens will promote the overall health of the courses’ turf”, Director of Golf Course Maintenance Keith Ihms, CGCS said, “Aeration also works toward removing thatch and building stronger root systems”.

The main purpose of pulling cores is to manage the thatch layer on the greens. The thatch layer is mostly made up of dying and un-decomposed leaf and grass material. By pulling cores we are removing some of that material and preventing it from building up to an unacceptable level.

Thatch causes the greens to become soft and spongy, which can make for poor putting conditions. When thatch gets to this point it also can become a problem dealing with the other issues it causes, such as fungus growth, mower scalping and “localized dry spots,” which will not absorb and retain moisture.

Aerating creates openings in the surface for water and nutrients to be absorbed, as well as the sand that will be used to smooth the putting surface, fill in voids and amend the green profile.

A second sand topdressing will be necessary a week or so after aeration to help fill in aeration holes and smooth the surface.

Weather permitting, aeration and maintenance dates and locations will be:

  • Oct. 1    – Berksdale Golf Course will be closed for aeration.
  • Oct. 2    – Berksdale Golf Course will be closed until 11 a.m. for maintenance.
  • Oct. 2    – Kingswood Golf Course will be closed for aeration.
  • Oct. 3    – Kingswood Golf Course will be closed until 11 a.m. for maintenance.
  • Oct. 3    – Highlands Golf Course will be closed for aeration.
  • Oct. 4    – Highlands Golf Course will be closed until 11 a.m. for maintenance.
  • Oct. 4     – Dogwood Golf Course will be closed for aeration.
  • Oct. 5     – Dogwood Golf Course will be closed until 11 a.m. for maintenance.
  • Oct. 8     – Bella Vista Country Club Golf Course will be closed for aeration.
  • Oct 9      – Bella Vista Country Club Golf Course will be closed until 11 a.m. for maintenance.

13 Green Kingswood

 

Pictured is #13 green Kingswood, the painted lines are the edge of the original greens cavity. Over the last 20 or so years the surrounding Bermudagrass has encroached into the bent grass drastically reducing the size of the green.

The green has become so small that pin locations have been reduced to just a few areas and the foot traffic takes a toll during the summer months.  This results in more man hours spent maintaining this green and an increased cost in chemicals and fertilizers to keep the green playable.

The decision was made to expand the green back to its original size using bent grass sod grown onsite on our nursery green and possibly sod from the closed holes on Berksdale.

The green will only need to be closed for 2-3 days during the fall in order to give the staff time to strip the Bermuda grass and install the bentgrass sod.

The process will be as follows, with all work being completed by Golf Maintenance.

  • The Bermuda will be sprayed with herbicide every 14 days until frost. Once the Bermuda starts dying it will turn brown but still be playable.
  • The bent grass nursery will receive additional fertility to get it ready to be transplanted.
  • Towards the end of October or first of November the dead Bermuda will be stripped, the ground will be lightly graded to match the green surface and bent grass will be taken from the nursery and laid around the green.
  • The green will be reopened once the new sod has been laid.
  • During the fall the new sod will be rolled and topdressed and grown slightly taller than the green to encourage rooting.
  • In the early spring of 2019 the height will gradually be taken down to greens height at which time the new sod will be playable as a greens surface.
  • We fully expect the new area to need additional maintenance during the 2019 season until it is fully established. This will include additional hand watering, topdressing, and small tine aeration.
  • The large oscillating fan from #6 Berksdale will be moved to the left side of #13 green Kingswood and the small square fans in the back of the green will be removed.

We appreciate your patience during this time and apologize for any inconvenience. We are confident that this project will improve your golfing experience.

Thank you.